Justice. We’ve heard the cry for it from school and restaurant shootings, from the family and friends of a black teenager gunned down by a young cop only 90 minutes after his swearing-in, and from a growing number of men and women violated sexually by predatory men in positions of importance or prominence. Sometimes the word “justice” gets replaced with “vengeance,” which means something else entirely, but nonetheless, we hear the desperate calls for it from those who feel powerless against those in authority over them. Common with all of these cries for justice is the anger and vehemence with which these calls are made. Some of the demonstrations surrounding some of these events have almost taken on the tone of lynching parties, which is a natural result of what happens when violence has occurred claiming innocent lives, and those left as victims in its wake feel they have no power to change what has caused the evil in the first place.

I can personally identify with that sense of hopelessness and despair, along with the rage that usually accompanies situations in which one becomes a victim of other people’s evil schemes, finding I can do nothing about them except cry out to God. In dealing with my own situation, I have found God guiding me to different scriptures to aid me in praying about the problems in accordance with His will. One of those scriptures I’ve been praying out of in recent months is Psalm 94, identified by scholars as one of the justice psalms. In this psalm, God is implored to avenge His people who faithfully follow and serve Him on those who oppress, rob, and even murder them. The oppressors in this psalm are those in positions of power and authority who have the means to crush anyone at will who tries to stop them or call them to account. They tend to attack those who are the most vulnerable and least capable of fighting back. The psalm begins with a call for God to be the God of vengeance, and to bring “recompense” or turnabout, onto those who have attacked and abused others. The psalm describes the offenders as those who laugh off any kind of acknowledgment from God of their actions, assuming He pays no attention to whatever they do, no matter how evil it may be.

The psalmist follows up this description of the offenders with a series of rhetorical questions that point out the folly of regarding God as either uninvolved, unconcerned, or nonexistent when it comes to watching and taking note of what evil is inflicted on others. God is described here as the one who made the ear and the eye, and most certainly hears and sees everything that goes on within and among His creation. He is also the one who gives humans the capacity to learn, and gives His reprimands to nations and individuals that defy Him and His principles. A key verse in this psalm is 11: “The Lord knows the thoughts of man, That they are a mere breath.” The idea here is that there is nothing that anyone on this earth can do that will ever escape God’s notice, and that they will be held accountable by Him for it.

As for those who have been violated and victimized in one way or another, the psalmist writes that they are blessed by God if they follow Him and listen to His correction for the sin in their own lives, allowing Him to teach them the right way He has laid out for the world to follow. Such persons find God intervening and providing help and peace in trying situations caused by those determined to harm them. The psalmist makes it clear that God never turns His back on His children who call out to Him for deliverance and justice. He also declares in the psalm that God will work in a nation or culture to change the powers in control toward that which He declares to be right, bringing a halt to the injustice and oppression. Then in verse 16, the psalmist pours out two rhetorical questions which focus attention on God’s intervening grace and help while oppression is ongoing. The questions bring out the fact that God will not wait until the day of final judgment, when Christ returns to earth, to mete out His justice against those who absolutely refuse to stop doing evil to His faithful ones.

This leads into the final stanza in which the psalmist writes of how God has protected and cared for him through all the attacks against him, and of how He continues to help him. He describes how God’s mercy and love keep sustaining him through an ongoing threat against him by those in places of power. He shares how God even helps him with anxiety over the oppression, bringing peace and hope where there appears to be nothing but hopelessness and despair. Then, in verse 20, another rhetorical question concerning corrupt evil powers is raised: “Can a throne of destruction be allied with You, One which devises mischief by decree?” This question drives home the fact that God will not work with a corrupt government or business or any other human organization that seeks to cruelly oppress the most vulnerable, weakest, and most helpless people. Even as such evil powers gather their forces together to silence and destroy those who are endeavoring to live for God, the Almighty is working to bring their evil schemes back on their own heads, as the psalmist describes. God knows the plans that arise in the hearts and minds of evil people even before they hatch them, and He is prepared to rescue and protect His faithful followers from being destroyed spiritually by them. The psalmist points out this contrast between the plots of those trying to destroy their faith and God’s protection for them from that fate. Psalm 94 concludes with verse 23 in which God is shown bringing the wicked conniving of evil people back on them, ultimately destroying them if they remain unrepentant of their wrongdoing.

The reason this psalm has resonated with me in recent years is because I too, as a writer, a husband of a loving wife of 24 years, and as a Christian minister, have been the target of an evil plot by a large organization I can’t even name directly, because I don’t know who all it includes. For the past 15 years, since my wife and I moved to Black Mountain, North Carolina, to seek new ministry opportunities, I have found myself instead being attacked by the large and powerful LGBTQ community and their supporters in the Asheville area with an all-out effort to force me into the gay lifestyle. I’m talking about phone calls from gay men wanting me to come and have rendezvous with them, lesbians practicing witchcraft telling me to my face “We’re going to make you come out,” and numerous hacks and attacks on my computers with Trojan horses and other malware attempting to block me from writing anything about homosexuality. Added to this has been day and night harassment in our apartment while I have been there in an effort to unnerve me, getting me so upset, that I might spout a verbal threat against someone personally, for the purpose of having authorities summoned immediately to have me taken away to a state mental hospital. There psychiatrists would be charged with the task of “deprogramming me of my bigoted religious beliefs,” and persuading me that I am a queer who needs to leave his wife and go live that way among the LGBTQ community. The main practical problem with this: I have absolutely no desire for or inclination to engage in gay sex, the litmus test for determining if one’s sexual orientation goes that way.

If all of this reads as too far-fetched, let me share with you what I have learned about the radical elements of the LGBTQ movement. They operate under the belief that gay people are the most “evolved” of all humans, and that all of humanity should be moving in that direction sexually. Never mind what God said about human sexuality in Genesis 2. That’s totally irrelevant and mythological to them. What I’ve also learned about them, especially male queers, is that when they want new gay sex partners, they recognize almost no restraints on getting what they want. They will harass a man they see and want in stores or other public places, particularly restrooms, to try to get them to come with them. The usage of witchcraft and sorcery against men who won’t comply with what they want is another tactic some are employing, calling upon the forces of spiritual darkness to turn a straight man away from his wife and family to come join up with them. None of this has worked with me, and won’t, because God has kept his hand of care on me, just as the writer of Psalm 94 wrote, with the promise that His justice is coming against those who have persisted in attacking me in these ways.

One other thing to note in all my experience with this is the fact that LGBTQ rights activists and their friends aren’t the only people involved in this effort to discredit and silence me, which is really the main goal. There is a larger, hidden organization behind them, something that attorney Jay Sekulow of the American Center for Law and Justice has identified as a “deep state,” one with an agenda to force our entire country and the world into the ultimate realization of Karl Marx’s anarchistic state he called Utopia. The LGBTQ community is easy for this organization to use, since they share many of the same political and social goals. One of their primary objectives is to eliminate all vestiges of the Christian faith that stand not only in opposition to homosexuality and other departures from what God established for human sexuality, but also any teaching that call for people to devote themselves to God in Christ. The belief here is that with Christianity’s influence eliminated from the earth through whatever means of coercion or genocide is necessary, the world will then be able to move unopposed into such a supposedly perfect existence. Once again, the primary method employed in achieving this now is the tactic of discredit and silence, which is what I have been experiencing.

In reading Psalm 94, I find God reminding me He has seen and heard everything that has been done against me and my wife, and His judgment and justice are coming for it. I have no need to seek vengeance on any of these people, because He will expose their evil deeds and plans at the appropriate time. According to this psalm, God will show Himself to be God,and His Word, which so many today so quickly reject as the truth. Does God love LGBTQ people? Absolutely, because He made them in His own image, and sent His Son to die for them, just like He did for me and all the rest of us sinners. But there comes a point in time in Which He says, “No more of this evil!” and stops it in whatever way He deems best. While He permits His faithful followers to be martyred for their faith, He will never allow them to be arbitrarily forced to go against Him or His truth, without His judgment coming against those who attempt this. This is the hope in which I continue to live and work, praying that some from these groups will come to recognize the lies of Satan that have deceived them, and turn away from this evil. That’s all possible through Jesus Christ.

(Scripture quotations from New American Standard Bible, 1995 updated edition).

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